Doomsday Clock

EK2

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We're still living in the most perilous times since the end of World War II, according to the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists and its trademark Doomsday Clock. Many 'doomsday' predictions have surfaced over the years. If you haven't heard of the Doomsday Clock, It is intended to reflect basic changes in the level of continuous danger in which mankind lives in the nuclear age. The clock is only an imaginary reminder for humanity to act to save the planet and doesn't predict the exact date the world will end. The Doomsday Clock was created by the board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists in 1947 as a response to nuclear threats and has been adjusted twenty times since 1947, reflecting the ever-changing international state of affairs pertaining to global nuclear weapons programs. The concept is simple – the closer the minute hand is to midnight, the closer the board believes the world is to disaster. How would we actually measure how close we are to the end of the world? One might imagine having actual data: maybe a wormhole leading to a future date and allowing direct observation of when humanity expires. But if the universe is consistent - which is to say paradoxes cannot occur - knowing this information will not allow us to change the date. The value of any information about the risks we face lies in how they allow us to reduce the risk. On January 24, 2019, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced that the Doomsday Clock would remain where it has been for the past year, at two minutes to midnight, which is the closest we've ever come to midnight. While it's a relief that the clock did not move forward, it's also disappointing we did not gain any time in the past year. We as people have come to view human civilization as something indestructible. Unfortunately, dealing with emerging technological threats is a challenge. Advances in artificial intelligence have led a number of prominent individuals to express concern about human command and control capabilities in the field of national and international scales.

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Downloads include choice of MP3, WAV, or FLAC

We're still living in the most perilous times since the end of World War II, according to the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists and its trademark Doomsday Clock. Many 'doomsday' predictions have surfaced over the years. If you haven't heard of the Doomsday Clock, It is intended to reflect basic changes in the level of continuous danger in which mankind lives in the nuclear age. The clock is only an imaginary reminder for humanity to act to save the planet and doesn't predict the exact date the world will end. The Doomsday Clock was created by the board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists in 1947 as a response to nuclear threats and has been adjusted twenty times since 1947, reflecting the ever-changing international state of affairs pertaining to global nuclear weapons programs. The concept is simple – the closer the minute hand is to midnight, the closer the board believes the world is to disaster. How would we actually measure how close we are to the end of the world? One might imagine having actual data: maybe a wormhole leading to a future date and allowing direct observation of when humanity expires. But if the universe is consistent - which is to say paradoxes cannot occur - knowing this information will not allow us to change the date. The value of any information about the risks we face lies in how they allow us to reduce the risk. On January 24, 2019, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced that the Doomsday Clock would remain where it has been for the past year, at two minutes to midnight, which is the closest we've ever come to midnight. While it's a relief that the clock did not move forward, it's also disappointing we did not gain any time in the past year. We as people have come to view human civilization as something indestructible. Unfortunately, dealing with emerging technological threats is a challenge. Advances in artificial intelligence have led a number of prominent individuals to express concern about human command and control capabilities in the field of national and international scales.

Share